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Best Kitchen Knives Forum

author
Paul Gonzalez
• Sunday, 22 November, 2020
• 38 min read

Share your thoughts on subjects not knife related. A forum for all discussions pertaining to the virus, face masks, medical issues, news, etc.

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Contents

A hangout for the professional chef/cook to share their views on cooking for a living. To find out more information on job listings, please send the poster a private message.

I have about 2 years of serious cooking experience, and I own a set of Willing knives. I will also read through other threads here and also see what knives the experts use (and filter out marketing).

A lot of the best blades don't look as pretty, but that can be balanced with a custom handle. This can come in a variety of thicknesses, but most are not made to deal with bone.

A modern variation is the Kirk cleaver, which clips off some spine to give a tip. The Japanese have a lot of blades, almost one for every usage and specialty.

It's the Japanese take on the French Chef's knife, though there are a variety of profiles. The average weight is about what the next size down of European knife is, even lighter.

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I think being able to have a longer blade at a lighter weight makes a blade more versatile, as there are longer distinct sections of the flatter heel area, some belly to help with slicing, and the tip. European knives are generally softer, thicker, and heavier.

If you find yourself regularly making loud contact with your cutting board, this is the blade for you. Based on your advice and some reading I've done, I'm looking for either a French chef knife or auto (like Willing/Kramer 25 cm or Miami Birchwood 9.5”).

I've been using a Santos for my general vegetable prep for the past 10 years and recently bought a more traditional chef knife. I find it hard to get away from the Santos for the long straight edge seems to do more work easier, especially when doing stuff like a fine chop on garlic.

The steel is excellent, very easy to maintain but with good hardness that is pretty tough and not chippy. Well Kramer's, Miami Birchwood, and Saboteurs are all different beasts.

For people who buy (a lot) from places like Japanese Knife Imports or Chef Knives to Go, they value the blade they get at a price point. And in a pinch grip a perfectly fitted ferrule isn't so meaningful.

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However, I can ultimately change my mechanics and the quality differences between the Kramer and say a “forged” knife from a big box store are huge. However, I can ultimately change my mechanics and the quality differences between the Kramer and say a “forged” knife from a big box store are huge.

While I very much like the steel and quality of my Maxwell, after months of use I came to realize that I prefer a western profile. It isn't that the slimmer auto style is bad in any way and it surely has its positives.

There are a lot of different opinions on kitchen knives in these pages. I tried every traditional style that exists and own many Japanese and Chinese knives.

A proper French Chef's knife is a versatile tool. 10-inch or larger Chef's knives are meant to cover a standard cutting board well.

Paring knives always changed but that Author was the work horse. Every knife maker I’ve spoken to about hates it because it makes it difficult to sharpen the full length of the cutting edge.

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I love it for its intrinsic strength and the ability to use it as a light cleaver. My heavy Author easily goes through chicken, lamb and baby back ribs and the like.

Now retired, I’m looking at finding a nicer one I wouldn’t have abused at work. Percival has a forged model that looks pretty good for about $800 in Arizona Ironwood.

I've been using a Santos for my general vegetable prep for the past 10 years and recently bought a more traditional chef knife. I find it hard to get away from the Santos for the long straight edge seems to do more work easier, especially when doing stuff like a fine chop on garlic.

I'm currently looking for a single do-all knife because I will have to move in ~2-3 years time. There are a lot of different opinions on kitchen knives in these pages.

I tried every traditional style that exists and own many Japanese and Chinese knives. A proper French Chef's knife is a versatile tool.

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10-inch or larger Chef's knives are meant to cover a standard cutting board well. Paring knives always changed but that Author was the work horse.

Every knife maker I’ve spoken to about hates it because it makes it difficult to sharpen the full length of the cutting edge. I love it for its intrinsic strength and the ability to use it as a light cleaver.

My heavy Author easily goes through chicken, lamb and baby back ribs and the like. Now retired, I’m looking at finding a nicer one I wouldn’t have abused at work.

Percival has a forged model that looks pretty good for about $800 in Arizona Ironwood. The Author 4584 appears to have a similar profile to the one I'm currently using (entry-level Willing 8"), only better made/professional grade.

At least people with one hobby don't have to go through the process and the pile of stuff so many times. At the risk of dominating this thread: It kind of depends on what you prefer for a tip.

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A banjo bunk, Santos, Kirk cleaver, and kiritsuke have more of a pronounced tip than a Nair or Chinese vegetable cleaver (Chuka-bocho to the Japanese. Obviously the weigh distribution means the first four knives I named also have less of a forward balance but your grip point can alter that too.

There are guts with large flat spots as well, though you may be leaving the name brands and going to Japanese smiths. Individual smiths or brands will have different spine thicknesses and tapers as well.

I tend to choose auto or a cleaver/Nair (the Japanese say their Nair is the small brother to the Chinese cleaver) and not use a bunk, Santos, kiritsuke, or Kirk cleaver. Well Kramer's, Miami Birchwood, and Saboteurs are all different beasts.

For people who buy (a lot) from places like Japanese Knife Imports or Chef Knives to Go, they value the blade they get at a price point. And in a pinch grip a perfectly fitted ferrule isn't so meaningful.

If you find yourself wanting to cut a winter squash and it rolls, it may take some blade with it. Also, if you break up your own chicken, the softer steel of the Willing is fine for the back.

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I have made a whack of bikinis in they are wonderful for vegetables but not very versatile. There are plenty of guys in the makers' forum that do integral bolsters and will make you a one off custom.

You get the advantage of thin geometry, great steel of your choice and heat treated and tailored for your desired hardness with endless options if you go custom. I'm a stock removal guy, so I can't help you with integral bolsters but there's a great group of very friendly makers there.

It is extremely tough and doesn't form large carbides so it can be sharpened nearly as keen as carbon steel. The toughness of these steels allows a maker to run it hard and thin without the edge being chippy.

I eventually chopped through the entire 2×4 with no chipping or rolling damage. Steels that form larger carbides will excel at edge retention but won't get as sharp and you risk carbide tear out at thin geometries.

Depending on the use, most makers will vary the hardness and edge geometry to get the optimal performance. One thing with most production knives is that they are usually a couple of points low on the optimal hardness and thick behind the edge.

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Its done this way, so they don't have to worry about warranty claims for chippy knives but there is performance left on the table. Every steel is different so you have to make sure the hardness is matched to the geometry to get the optimal performance.

Reviewers are particularly taken with the handle, which they describe as “comfortable” and “ergonomic,” as well as the incredibly sharp, 12-inch blade. Two years ago, celebrity chef Sean Brock shared a photo of a truly stunning chef’s knife on his Instagram “entirely handcrafted from reclaimed materials found in the mountains of East Tennessee.” Its stainless steel blade was forged from a “100+ year old 1095 high carbon sawmill blade” while the dark wood handle was carved from “some old growth cocoon.” The knife was custom-made by John Phillips, who sells the knives one by one to his newsletter subscribers.

It’s damn near impossible to cop one of these beauties, but if you manage to, it’ll become an instant family heirloom. Michelin-starred chefs Elise Knack and Anna Hieronymus recently told us Shun is “one of our favorite knife brands.” And with a lifetime guarantee and a blade that stays sharp longer than it has any right to, it’ll be one of yours, too.

Risen was one of the earliest entrants into the fast-growing contingent of direct-to-consumer cookware brands, starting out as a Kickstarter launched in 2014. In 2018, writer Parthia Rosin penned a convincing ode to the Honcho Kobe, or Long Chef’s Knife, a Japanese-made chef’s knife handcrafted in the seaside town of Banjo and available at L.A.-based Japanese home goods store The Good Liver.

Rosin writes that she was immediately taken with the wood handle, which is “meticulously worked through a char coaling process that ensures its water resistant and antibacterial” as well as the blade made with two types of steel for added structural integrity. “It’s so you learn the technique of holding the knife.” It also comes with a finger guard, which is perfect for amateur chefs in first, second, or third grade.

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Lightweight Japanese-style knives may be the blades du jour, but if you want a knife with some serious heft, one that can take a beating, go for the 11.1 ounce Author. “I prefer the weight and thickness of the blade of this heavier knife,” says James Beard–nominated pastry chef Shannon Swindle.

I'd like to open less than $200 for 3 knives : 8" Chef, 6" utility, and a small paring knife. I have no idea what kind of price you could GE online.

Since kitchen cutlery is a long term investment, and very personal try if possible before you buy. Lively, I think the AG Russell forged Italian knives are fantastic. I've compared the cutting ability against my older,thicker German chef knives,from when I was in the restaurant business, and they are superior. The pricing is good, as well.

I just purchased a 6" chef and 3.5” paring knife of the Hershey Shun Classic line, and they are really really really nice. Thinner and harder than European style knives.

I'd say Spider's discontinued Pro Culinary line was the best value for the money. The new Yin-Yang knives from Spider only cover the utility knife on your list.

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VERY REASONABLE PRICE ARE : 1)era (Sweden, se)27c12 2)ice(port? American made kitchen knives in D2 steel at a nice price.

We received some Hershey Wasabi knives for Christmas. I'd like to open less than $200 for 3 knives : 8" Chef, 6" utility, and a small paring knife.

“ It's commonly accepted that the best knives are forged -- hammered into shape from a single piece of metal. An alternative method is to stamp them out of a sheet of metal; this process produces a lighter, thinner blade without a lip between the handle and blade (called a bolster on forged knives).

Many cheaper knives are made this way, and reviewers say they can feel flimsy and hard to control. In side-by-side tests, experts are amazed at how well these perform next to forged knives that are three times as expensive.

We received some Hershey Wasabi knives for Christmas. They have a track record of serving generations of people in kitchens that the new trendy stuff can't touch.

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It's a Forever Sharp serrated knife that is super cheep. Radar Kitchen Cutlery We have knives going on 40 years old that are still as good as the day my family bought them.

As I've said many times before, after I tried the Tojo's, I got rid of all my European and American knives. Names like Henkel's, Author, Dexter, Case and so on all fell to the Japanese kitchen knives.

The Tojo Pro's cut like lasers and the edge retention leaves the other stuff wanting. Hershey's “Shun Series” are also excellent for the money.

Both brands offer great looking and performing knives for the money. It would be great if one could get an American made kitchen knife that worked as well as those from Japan.

I recently bought a 7" Santos...a very nice knife formless than $60. As I've said many times before, after I tried the Tojo's, I got rid of all my European and American knives.

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Names like Henkel's, Author, Dexter, Case and so on all fell to the Japanese kitchen knives. The Tojo Pro's cut like lasers and the edge retention leaves the other stuff wanting.

Hershey's “Shun Series” are also excellent for the money. Both brands offer great looking and performing knives for the money.

It would be great if one could get an American made kitchen knife that worked as well as those from Japan. I think I read somewhere that they used to make the Chicago Cutlery kitchen knives.

I have two of those that I really like, “high carbon stainless steel”, natural handle materials, and it's very easy to get them super-sharp. But it would be difficult to find USA made Chicago Cutlery products; their new stuff is all imported from China.

To help you decide, we did exhaustive research to determine which are the best sets on the market and spent the past several weeks putting the 11 finalists to the test. We found ourselves repeatedly using terms like “full tang” (when a blade is constructed of one metal piece that extends the length of the handle, which is preferable), “forged steel” (pricier than its stamped counterpart, but sturdier) and “heavy bolster” (the junction between the blade and handle that helps with balance).

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Generally, most of the knives we tested were nice and sharp out of the box and all were stainless steel grade or better, but from there they varied when it came to grip, build and weight, which affected performance. The three winners earned points for great maneuverability, aesthetics and included extras.

The knives stayed sharp through our multitude of tests, and we were big fans of the cushion-grip handles that kept them from slipping, as well as the classic look of the chestnut-stained wood block. If you’re looking for a complete knife set you’ll be proud of at a price that won’t put a dent in your savings account, this is the clear winner.

If you’d like to step things up a few notches, it’s hard to go wrong with the Willing Pro 7-Piece Knife Block Set. Complete with four knives all forged from a single piece of high-carbon stainless steel, the precision-honed blades are extra-sharp, stylish and just feel really nice in your hand.

We were blown away by the sturdy construction, comfort of use and reliable execution that came with each piece in this all-inclusive set. At first blush, we didn’t think we’d like the poly padded handles, but they were actually extremely comfortable and kept the knives from slipping, even after they had just been hand-washed.

Plus, it is exceptionally sharp and took practically zero effort to drag through a few-days-old loaf of crusty bread, take the rind off a cantaloupe or slice berthing pieces from a tender tomato or peach, earning it more points than the Willing or Author versions. After plenty of chopping, slicing and dicing, the Chicago Cutlery knives remained as sharp as their brand-new counterparts.

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When you’re seeking out knives that are super sharp, durable, ergonomic and will last a lifetime, we highly suggest you stop and give this standout set a good look. Heckles, which was founded back in 1731, also takes into account the benefits of both Western and Asian knife design.

For example, the chef’s knife blade has a broad curve to allow for a Western-style rocking motion, but a straight back that aligns with the Asian chopping style. They’re forged from a single piece of high-carbon stainless steel, making them harder and sharper than many other models.

Lasers are then used to angle the edges of the blades for precision sharpness, and the process seems to have succeeded. The chef’s knife, which was our favorite from the Willing set, for one, practically dropped through a head of lettuce, and easily sliced through carrots, onions, herbs and more.

It’s got history, a classic design and high-tech, high-quality craftsmanship that comes with a lifetime warranty (on workmanship and materials under normal conditions). Thinner than other knives we tested, the handles fit perfectly in a woman’s hand, but our male tester wished they were a smudge more substantial.

It glided through onions, potatoes and tomatoes, took the corn off the cob with ease and sliced through the tough rind of a pineapple like it was nothing. The paring and utility knives fit comfortably into our hands and easily sliced everything we tested them on: limes, oranges, strawberries, carrots, zucchini, radishes, you name it.

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The serrated bread knife drew right through our baguette loaves, making us dream of a second career as an apprentice in a French boulangerie. We couldn’t suss out any difference in sharpness by touch, performance chopping up onions, carrots and tomatoes or from the paper test, of which both used and new Author knives made mincemeat.

If you have the money to invest, however, we think the classic, elegant set will not only look like a crown jewel on your kitchen counter, but also continue to dazzle for a lifetime. We spent weeks testing these knife sets, comparing each model by the same criteria, including overall performance, build quality, added accessories and warranty, taking detailed notes on how specific knives functioned based on everything from sharpness and materials to heft and hand-feel to how they looked and the usefulness of any included extras.

We ordered two of each set so that after spending several days slicing and dicing our hearts out, we were able to compare the used knive’s sharpness to their just-out-of-the-box twins. As avid home cooks, we already spend a significant amount of time in the kitchen, but as our dining room table became overtaken with woodblocks filled with knives to test, we quickly found ourselves continually looking for things to chop.

Chef’s knife: This standard tool is made to take on most of the bigger jobs in the kitchen. Its weight makes it easier to chop uploads of ingredients in one go, say, for a big pot of soup or to roast a bounty of potatoes and vegetables.

We tested chopping through meat, onions, carrots, herbs and more, noting the knife’s design, grip, weight and general feel. We noted the ease of drawing the blade through different food items, and also whether the knife glided through paper or snagged.

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So, for this knife, we cored and peeled apples and tomatoes, and minced shallots and garlic to evaluate its performance and feel. Too many items to list, including tomatoes, hard cheese, oranges, carrots and salami, were used to test how easily this knife could live up to its name.

We looked at ease of cutting through difficult foods, as well as how thin we could slice something softer, such as a tomato. Forged knives, for example, are typically stronger than stamped, which are cut from a flat metal sheet.

Full tang, meaning the blade extends through the handle, helps create balance and overall heft. Feel: So much of handling a kitchen knife rests on how it feels in your hand, so we paid special attention to the heaviness of the blades and handles, maneuverability, weight distribution and ease of sliding the knives in and out of their blocks.

While we realize taste is subjective, we noted our general reaction to how nice they looked. Build had a maximum of 35 points: quality (15); knife feel (10); room for knuckle clearance (5); appearance (5).

Handcrafted in Semi, Japan, the durable, beautiful and razor-sharp Damascus stainless steel blades had us oohing and aching at their ability to perfectly slice through everything. The paring knife, for instance, was so sharp that as we used it to core a tomato, we found it was shaving skin off our finger from the slightest touch.

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Admittedly, we thought the claim that the block’s built-in ceramic sharpeners would work with each use was a gimmick, but we were quickly impressed that the knives really did seem to get sharper every time we chopped and sliced. As far as performance, the all-stainless steel, full-tang knives handled well and felt balanced, although they did feel overly heavy in our hands.

We also appreciated the fact that the handles are labeled so you can quickly grab the correct knife. These knives scored lower on performance than most models: They weren’t as sharp, the hollow metal handles felt too light, causing an imbalance, and they tended to get slippery when wet.

Besides the value price, it features lightweight, dishwasher-safe stainless steel blades that will cover your cutting needs. When variety is key to your cooking game but staying on budget is too, you’d be wise to consider picking up this basic but useful 18-piece set.

Our aesthetic biases had us thinking these would prove to be more flash than performance, though we know some will dub the highly stylized look as awesome. The geometric design of the military-grade G10 handles actually fit really comfortably into our hands and their slight texture made slippage a non-issue.

The full-tang titanium nitride-coated German steel blades were razored sharp and excellent at chopping and slicing everything we threw at them. The curved blade of the chef’s knife was helpful in chopping, but its thinness made it feel a bit light.

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In fact, the heavy handles, paired with thin blades, seemed to affect the balance of the knives. And, at a rather hefty price, it includes just five knives (chef’s, paring, utility, serrated and Santos) plus a honing steel.

Then again, if your home decor is Kylo Men meets Jacques Pepin, put these on your wish list immediately. If you know a college student who has made the move from their dorm to their first apartment, this colorful set of kitchen knives would make a fine housewarming gift.

They’re BPA-free and come with matching sheaths, so they can be easily stored in a drawer, saving precious counter space. They didn’t feel especially sharp out of the box, our fingers smashed against the cutting board as we chopped and the blades felt heavy compared to the plastic handles, which threw off the balance of the knives in our hands.

Its unique, vertical tempered glass block had one family member wrinkling his nose with distaste, two teenagers dubbing it “sick” (a good thing) and one who kept waffling between “so cool” and “trying too hard.” But whether you like the looks of the glass block, no one can argue that these are great knives. Nice and sharp out of the box, they’re made using high-carbon German steel, a bolster for support and neoprene handles with full tang, offering fairly even weight distribution.

It also only contained five knives, one of which was a boning knife which doesn’t see a lot of use, and the smaller, rubber handles weren’t especially comfortable. Made of honed, stainless steel blades and plastic curved handles with full tang, the chef’s knife was our favorite, although it felt a bit light in the hand.

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Overall, the knives were sharp out of the box, look nice in their wood block and come with an affordable price tag when on sale (which seems to be most of the time at most retailers). We waded through all the nonsense and set out to find the best chef’s knives for home cooks at the best prices.

Read on to discover the best chef’s knife of 2020 in each category, including the best all-around, runner-up, and an impressive budget pick. It’s strong enough to get through tough vegetables with ease and delicate enough to chop tender herbs without smashing them.

The agile blade is relatively straight and tapers at the end, giving it a curve reminiscent of a Western knife, but the same sharp edge of a Japanese model. We also found this knife to be lively and responsive in our hands, comfortable to hold and not too bulky.

We also know from using them in the Epicurus Test Kitchen that they stay sharp for a long time and are easy to sharpen. With its simple design and finish, wooden handle, and dimples along the blade that keep food from sticking to the sides, this knife is a kitchen workhorse that will last a long time.

The hollow handles of Global knives are filled with a precise amount of sand to ensure perfect balance. Sure, the finish quality on this Victorinox knife isn’t nearly as high as the Mac or the Global, but at less than $40, it’s a total steal.

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It glided through tough sweet potatoes with precision and delicacy and made quick work of slicing an onion. It isn’t full tang, meaning the metal of the stainless-steel blade doesn’t extend all the way to the base of the handle, which is generally said to indicate a lower-quality, less-sturdy knife.

As Test Kitchen Director Chris Morocco told us, “It’s probably the best chef’s knife out there for the money. Photo by Chelsea Kyle, Prop Styling by Beatrice Chaste The first step in evaluating a knife is getting a feel for the tool.

We some spent time with each of the 14 chef’s knives we tested just holding them in our hands, observing the quality of the metal and sharpened edge, the feel of the handle, and the overall weight of the knife. We then used each knife to chop raw sweet potatoes and onions and mince a pile of herbs.

From the start we were looking for a thin, sharp blade, which makes slicing easier and smoother and also weighs less overall. Naturally, we wanted a knife with a comfortable handle, which we interpreted as lightweight and smooth rather than heavy and long.

When you chop something, you’ll feel like you have greater control over the cutting motion and more of a connection with the knife. In addition to handling the heft and toughness of something like a potato, we wanted a knife that could slice through herbs without crushing them.

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We ultimately liked a smoother transition without the cuff, as it resulted in a lighter knife that made for an easy and comfortable slicing motion. Ultimately, we found it was a bit too heavy and not as nicely finished as we wanted, but it handled the job of cutting through hefty vegetables just fine.

For the purposes of this story, I limited the testing to eight-inch, Western-style, or hybrid Japanese-Western chef’s knives with a list price under $200, though most cost significantly less than that. Loosely, two attributes characterize a Western or hybrid style chef’s knife.

Harder steel holds a sharper edge for a longer period of time but can be more difficult to sharpen once it does get dull. And a very hard, very sharp edge can also be more delicate and brittle than a softer one, making cutting up a heavy squash, say, a little risky to the blade.

(However, a knife maker can mitigate that brittleness by adding another element to the mix: Molybdenum, for instance, is often used to give a very hard steel more flexibility.) A softer steel alloy, like those used in the German tradition, may be less sharp to begin with and get dull a little faster.

But it can be easier to re-sharpen, and better for heavier-duty jobs, like splitting bone-in chicken breasts, without worry that you’re going to damage the blade. “For everyone else, I have no way of knowing if you prefer heavy or light, a deeper throat, a special blade, something bigger.

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I used them in the normal course of my daily cooking, just to get to know them, and I also tested them in six important tasks: dicing an onion, slicing basil into chiffon, slicing tomatoes, cubing butternut squash, spreeing an orange and cutting up a whole chicken. Those tasks tell you almost everything you need to know about whether a knife is nimble and sharp, sturdy and powerful, and above all, comfortable and secure-feeling.

The knives ranged from $38 to about $200, and I found that price isn’t necessarily commensurate with quality and performance, though the very best knives are not cheap. A note on keeping your knives sharp: You can buy the best knife there is, but eventually you will need to sharpen it or it will be useless.

Home cooks can bring the knife to a professional or can buy a simple, plastic wheel grinder, which makes sharpening cheap, fast, and foolproof. Hayward says that he likes to relax at night with a glass of wine and a whetstone and painstakingly sharpen his hundreds of knives.

Made in Japan, it has a hard, super-sharp blade and a simple wooden handle that’s extremely comfortable and feels secure in the hand. The blade is beveled to a very thin, very acute angle, which makes it extraordinarily sharp.

It effortlessly bites through tomato skin and cuts a neat onion dice with ease. Both are made of a slightly softer steel than the best Japanese knives, and therefore they feel a little less sharp.

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When you chiffon basil with this knife, it feels like the leaves are springing off the blade in perfect ribbons all by themselves. It feels almost alive in your hand, super light, and extremely agile.

It bites through tomatoes with ease and supreme an orange into perfectly clean, neat segments in a few seconds. However, unlike the MAC, which has just enough sturdiness to deal with a chicken and butternut squash, this knife just doesn’t have the oomph for hefty jobs.

It has a scalpel-like delicacy and when I used it to tackle big, tough ingredients, it felt wrong, even a little dangerous, and I worried I would damage the blade. Hayward calls it “a living hell” to keep it sharpened correctly.

It was the second-lightest knife I tested, only slightly heavier than the Mason, but it doesn’t require special knowledge to sharpen. It’s made of just one piece of metal, including the handle, which is hollow and filled with sand, which provides a subtle, shifting balance that you don’t really notice while you’re using it.

The metal handle has dimples to provide the grip, and while some cooks think it gets slippery when used to cut chicken, meat, or anything juicy, I haven’t found that to be the case. It excels at tasks like slicing tomatoes, chiffonading basil, and dicing onion: It’s quite sharp and bites right through.

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Although it’s less well-suited to cutting up chicken or butternut squash, lacking the heft of the German models, with some extra care it can certainly get those jobs done. It’s in the hefty, powerful German style, made by a family-owned company in the United States.

Comparable to the Mason, I didn’t find the handle comfortable or secure. It’s a long, thin grip that’s completely smooth, without any contour at all, and though it looks beautiful, it felt slippery and small in my hand.

It’s a very nice knife, a classic, sturdy German blade with a deep belly that makes a rocking chop very comfortable. This is a wonderful knife, a Japanese-German hybrid, with a flat-sided wooden handle and a very sharp, very hard blade with a relatively wide, curved belly.

I loved the drippy, comfortable handle, and the feeling of power that came from this heavy, wide blade. But oddly, it didn’t seem as sharp as the others, as it was a bit of a struggle to make a clean tomato slice.

I wanted to like it because, of all the heavy knives, it was the most comfortable and balanced to hold, but it didn’t perform as well as I hoped. This knife tops many lists as a great value, but I found it to be the worst of the two worlds: light but not very sharp, cumbersome and large.

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It was reasonably sharp coming out of the box (though still on the dull side compared to most others on this list) but after a couple of weeks of use, it was a struggle to slice a tomato or an onion. IDK, but I like Mac, Mason and Mahavira a lot.

Ideally, the best chef knife needs to feature a super-sharp edge, comfortable handle, and a sleek tapered shape. Chef knives with such features make chopping and slicing of vegetables, fruits and ingredients easier.

You only need to analyze our top 10 picks below and carefully choose a chef knife that best matches your needs. Check Price on Amazon This is a premium quality chef knife with stainless steel construction.

It is an ultra-sharp knife that helps accomplish various cutting tasks with ease. Check Price on Amazon This is another versatile chef knife for professionals but one you can also use at home.

The knife features durable stainless steel construction and a tapered end. The knife can handle both small and big cutting tasks with ease.

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Check Price on Amazon This is another outstanding chef knife measuring 8 inches long. The knife delivers peak performances due to stunning design elements and high-quality materials.

Check Price on Amazon This is a valuable 7-piece knife set to consider buying today. It is an excellent set of knives that will fulfill all your kitchen cutting, slicing, and chopping needs.

The set features 5 different stainless steel knives a cutlery stand, sharpener, and safety finger guard. The knives are of the highest quality and feature a laser smooth finish.

Check Price on Amazon This is a classic chef knife made in Spain to the highest EU standards. The knife offers a seamless transition from handle to blade hence durable and long-lasting.

Pros Dishwasher safe hence easy to clean Sleek satin finish Long-lasting sharpness due to excellent honing Durable forged steel construction Check Price on Amazon This is another perfect chef knife set with two knives measuring 7 and 8 inches.

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The knife features a quality German steel with 15% chromium trace hence rust and corrosion-resistant. Moreover, the knife features a forged steel construction hence extremely durable.

Check Price on Amazon This is another ultra-sharp chef knife on the list to consider buying. The knife features excellent flexibility and corrosion-resistant due to enhanced nitrogen cooling.

Check Price on Amazon This is a professional chef with excellent features. The knife is versatile and suitable for cutting vegetables, meat, fillet, bread and much more.

The knife can easily handle various kitchen needs like cutting, slicing, chopping, dicing, mincing and much more. Moreover, the knife features an ergonomically shaped handle for comfortable gripping.

Overall, this is a beautiful design chef knife to buy with confidence today. The knife comes with a lifetime warranty and returns policy for confidence buying.

Pros Ergonomically shaped handle hence comfortable gripping 2.5 mm blade thickness hence sturdy and durable Multi-functional design to handle various kitchen tasks Long-lasting sharpness Check Price on Amazon This is our final best kitchen chef knife with excellent features.

These features ensure you choose a quality and durable knife that will give you value for money. Taking good care of the knife includes washing it clean and drying it after use.

Durability and edge retention A brand-new knife from the factory needs to maintain its sharpness for long. Such knives require excellent steel hardness and composition to serve you for that long.

8 inches long is ideal for cutting vegetables into half and handling other small tasks. It is worth noting that knives with full bolsters are difficult to sharpen.

We set out to find the very best model: one that's small and sharp enough for tasks that require dexterity, and comfortable enough for continued use. The top of the handle has a mini bolster, like a finger guard, that makes it comfortable to choke up on the knife and complete all sorts of detailed cutting tasks.

The wider, larger blade on the Kuhn Nikon paring knife is best for peeling produce and making a lot of turns; it covers more surface area and is easier to manipulate for those tasks. However, if you're doing a lot of small, precise cuts, like hulling strawberries or scoring fish, we recommend the lightweight and narrow Author knife.

It slides through strawberries, cheese, and apple peels with super smooth strokes, is extra-sharp, and has a nice size blade. We started testing all 13 paring knives by holding them in our hands to assess the comfort of the handle and the weight and feel of the knife.

To handle precise tasks like separating fruit and vegetable skins from their flesh and making small cuts, paring knives must have very sharp blades. According to Test Kitchen Director Chris Morocco, “Any excess weight in the handle just makes it feel like it's going to fall out of your hand.

Important factors to consider in paring knives are comfort and ease of grip, two things that'll improve the knife's accuracy and maneuverability in peeling small, knobby foods like ginger.

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Sources
1 www.delish.com - https://www.delish.com/cooking/recipe-ideas/a28108343/air-fryer-doughnuts-recipe/
2 airfried.com - https://airfried.com/air-fryer-donuts/
3 www.goodhousekeeping.com - https://www.goodhousekeeping.com/food-recipes/dessert/a34206857/air-fryer-donuts-recipe/
4 divascancook.com - https://divascancook.com/how-to-make-air-fryer-donuts-recipe/